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Jetronicab3i88

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About Jetronicab3i88

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  • Birthday 29/04/1990

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    Mallorca, Spain
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  1. Jetronicab3i88

    CVH Engine oil and Coolant guide!

    Hi, i wrote this Oil and Coolant guide for CVH engines a while back, hope it's useful to you all!CVH OIL COOLANT GUIDEThought i would make a small guide on engine oils and coolants for CVH engines for you all, the same questions get asked over and over.I do not claim to be a professional expert, but i have been studying on this on my own, for more than 3 years now, reading lots of literature on engine lubrication and cooling.I do not write this with the intention of this being some sort of bible, just something to guide you based on my knowldege of these subjects.-- ENGINE OIL --Some people might say you can run classic cars like Escorts and Fiestas on any oil you like, wrong!The main reason for that statement being wrong is called :ZincdialkyldithiophosphateZ D D P( ZDDP )Zddp, Zddp is a molecule or compound or whatever you want to call it of Zinc and Phosphorous.Zddp does one main thing in engine oil : it protects the flat tappets and cams in older engines like the CVH from wear. The way it works is the Phosphorous reacts chemically in areas where there is high friction and heat inside an engine, and the Zinc which is attached to the same molecule forms a sacrificial protective layer between those parts that acts like a microscopic cushion and keeps them from wearing.The contact between the camshaft lobes and their respective tappets are the part of the engine by far with the most friction inside an engine, the pressure in small spots between the cam lobe and its tapet can exceed 100.000 PSI!! yes, one hundred thousand pounds.In the CVH this is even more critical due to the CVH's extrmely stiff valve springs, which produce 220lbs of pressure at full valve lift, these high valve spring pressures combined with the CVH's not so good valvetrain oiling system, and possible neglect in terms of oil changes over the years, leads to the common cam and tappet wear problems the CVH is known for, and the nasty rattling that goes with it.So what is the matter with Zddp?Zddp used to be added in engine oil in generous amounts, between 1000 and 1400 parts per million during the 70s and 80s.However in the 90s it was found that Zinc was damaging to catalytic converters, so for the past 20+ years the amount of it in most oil has been getting lower and lower.Modern engines don't need Zinc almost at all, because the camshafts are roller type with low friction.We are at a point now where most oils contain between 800 and 900 parts per million of Zinc, some as little as 600, 1000 is acceptable for our engines, but 800 or 600 are far too little.Over the last years more and more classic cars are reporting issues with cmahsaft and tappet wear due to this.----------- Viscosity : -----------------The CVH was designed in an era where 20W-50 was almost universally used, however the CVH being an overhead cam engine with hydraulic tappets, it needs a thinner oil that will get to the top of the engine fast enough in cold temperatures but will also keep the tappets pumped up and working properly when hot.Because of this a 10W-40 Semi-synthetic oil or 15W-40 Mineral oil is the best choice for you run of the mill CVH that is sued on the street.if you have an engine that is old, and leaks or uses a lot of oil, you could run 20W-50, as long as you are very gentle when the engine is warming up.-------- RS Turbo Escort / Fiesta engines : -------------RS Turbos need a more specific oil choice, these engines run very hot and are usually driven hard.If your engine is standard and you don't beat on it too hard, you can get away with a 10W-40 Semi synthetic or full synthetic oil.If your engine has somewhat more power than standard and you drive it hard, you shoud probably use a 5W-50, 10W-50 or 15W-50 full synthetic oil.For really crazy builds running say +250hp and lots of boost, 10W-60 Full synthetic would be a good option if your oil temps are very high, 10W-50 or 15W-50 if you they're not so high.-- Here is a list of oils that are known to have high Zinc and would be good for CVHs --For standard N/A CVH engines :1 - Comma X-Flow Type XS 10W-40 ( Semi Synthetic, 1100ppm Zinc )https://www.amazon.co.uk/Comma-XFXS5L-X-Flow-10W40-Litre/dp/B00DYTO5VE/ref=sr_1_2?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1536228284&sr= 1-2&keywords=comma+xflow+10w402 - Comma X-Flow Type MF 15W-40 ( Mineral, same Zinc as former )www.amazon.co.uk/Comma-XFMF5L-X-Flow-15W40-Mineral/dp/B0052X4I303- Classic Oils Hot Hatch 10W-40 ( 1300ppm Zinc )https://www.classic-oils.net/Classic-Oils-Hot-Hatch-10W-404 - Morris Multivis 10W-40,https://www.onlinebearings.co.uk/Morris-Multivis-10-40-Semi-Synthetic-5-Litre.html5 - Millers CSS 10W-40 :https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-115267-millers-oils-css-10w-40-competition-semi-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx- For Turbo CVH engines :1 - Millers CFS 10W-40 Full syn.https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-115229-millers-oils-cfs-10w-40-competition-full-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx2 - Valvoline VR1 5W-50 Full syn.https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-73739-valvoline-vr1-racing-5w-50-premium-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx3 - Fuchs Titan Race ProS 10W-50 Fyll syn.https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-68898-fuchs-titan-race-pro-s-10w-50-ester-fully-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx4 - Mobil 1 5W-50 FS-X2 full syn.https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-68898-fuchs-titan-race-pro-s-10w-50-ester-fully-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx5 - Millers CFS 10W-60 Syll syn.https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-115231-millers-oils-cfs-10w-60-competition-full-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx6 - Mobil 1 10W-60 Full syn.https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-69026-mobil-1-10w-60-advanced-full-synthetic-engine-oil.aspx-------- COOLANTS --------Most people will tell you older engines should use IAT ( Inorganic ) coolants in older engines, these are typically Blue n the UK and Green in the rest of the world.This is a good choice in one way and bad in another.Inorganic coolants contain corrosion inhibitors which are :PhosphatesSilicatesNitratesand Borates.Silicates protect aluminium, copper, brass and cast iron, which is good, but they also contain Borates, which are designed for older engine made completely from cast iron, Borates protect cast iron but attack Aluminium, which isn't good.This type of coolant lasts about 2 years because the Inorganic corrosion inhibitors deplete quickly.Then we have Organic, ( OAT ) coolants, these coolants ditch the inorganic inhibitors for organic ones that act slower but last much longer.There are 4 types of OAT coolants :G12 and G12+ are the two first types of Organic OAT coolants, these don't contain Borates which is good, but also don't contain silicates which means they are not good for Copper / Brass heater matrixes, or lead solder, so it’s not a good idea for our older engines.G12++ and G13 OAT coolants on the other hand also don't have Borates, but DO have Silicates, this means they can be used without fear of damaging copper or brass heater matrixes or lead solder.G12++ and G13 are the most advanced coolants available currently, they were developed by Volkswagen to protect aluminium engines, and were developed for backwards compatibility with older systems.NEVER go by the colour of the coolant alone, while in most cases blue / green is IAT and pink/violet is OAT, it’s just a dye and you can never be sure, when you buy coolant see on the back of the label, if it doesn’t say G12++ or G13 look for :TL-774-G = G12++TL-774-J = G13I’ve looked into Evans Waterless coolant and my own opinion about it is that it’s not at all worth the money, you will have better cooling with a modern G12++/G13 coolant, i see no reason to use it.( G12++ and G13 are the same in terms of performance, but G13 is slightly more environmentally friendly as it replaces 10% of the ethylene glycol with glycerin )I hope this was helpful and you understand it all!!
  2. Jetronicab3i88

    JUST JOIN YOUR CLUB

    Hi just joined, have had my Cab only 6 months and love it
  3. Welcome to Escort Cabriolet Club. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    1. David Huber

      David Huber

      Hi Paul

       

      thanks for the welcome

      i have an 1988 Escort X3i cabriolet which I’m thinking of selling, but I’m not sure of its value

      its pretty much in mint condition with 56 k miles on the clock. It runs beautifully and everything works😆! It’s red and has a full Mot.

      it was my mother’s car but I’ve barely used  it in last 5 years.

       

      your advice would be appreciated 

      regards

       

      David

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